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There’s Still Good In This World And It’s Worth Fighting For

By Jason J. McGuire

I sometimes wish that I could gather everyone who will read these words into a room and cast the vision for where I believe God is leading us in this season of our ministry. Despite the challenges apparent in Albany, at New Yorker’s Family Research Foundation we are hopeful for the future.

I’m a bit of a nerd, so bear with me. In J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Two Towers, the second volume in the Lord of the Ring’s series, a hobbit named Samwise Gamgee plants this seed of hope into the heart of the chief protagonist, one Frodo Baggins.

“It’s like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo … Even darkness must pass. A new day will come. And when the sun shines it will shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something, even if you were too small to understand why. But I think, Mr. Frodo, I do understand. I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn’t. They kept going, because they were holding on to something. That there is some good in this world, and it’s worth fighting for.”

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One of the reasons why Tolkien’s writings resonate with us still today is because they remind us that even the most seemingly insignificant among us are part of a greater story. Today, in the midst of what often feels like insurmountable odds, the Author of our story whispers to our hobbit ears, “There is yet some good in this world, and it’s worth fighting for.”

At NYFRF, we see a day where God is honored, religious freedom flourishes, families thrive, and life is cherished. We know that we aren’t there yet and that the journey before us is long and treacherous, but we believe it is a vision worth pursuing. If you also desire this for our state, I invite you to join us in this fellowship.

Now, allow me to be more specific in our strategy.

In May 2017, we were blessed with the opportunity to purchase our ministry headquarters. The purchase necessitated a modest mortgage, though. Psalm 22:7 says, “the borrower is servant to the lender.” Agreeing with this principle, one of NYFRF’s 2019 goals is to retire the remaining $90,000 mortgage and return to a debt-free status.

We are currently renovating the main floor of our office building. God is providing an amazing array of volunteers that have been a blessing to our organization. They’re allowing NYFRF to renovate the property in a way that maximizes every dollar donated. We anticipate this phase of the renovation to be finished by the end of the year. Once complete, we will have a state-of-the-art facility equipped with a classroom that will allow our team to train like-minded allies, both onsite and online, on topics such as: how to run for public office, pro-life apologetics, speaking to the media, constitutional principles, and much more. Political pendulums swing and when the pendulum swings our direction again, there must be a people prepared—both spiritually and practically—to enter the realm of public policy and political office to advance principles consistent with our vision for New York and the nation.

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With looming societal discussions regarding socialism, assisted suicide, legalizing prostitution, contractual surrogacy and the free speech rights of pro-life pregnancy centers—we need to maximize every available opportunity to educate and advocate our position.

There is still good worth fighting for. Can I count on your support? If you are interested in mailing a check, please make it payable to “NYFRF” and send it to: PO Box 131, Spencerport, NY 14559-0131.

Thank you for standing with us.

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Jason J. McGuire is a veteran in the legislative fight for life in New York. As New Yorkers for Constitutional Freedoms’ Executive Director, McGuire lobbies the State Legislature regarding issues of religious freedom, and the pro-life, pro-family perspective. As President of New Yorker’s Family Research Foundation, he is working to educate social conservatives and other concerned New Yorkers on matters of public policy, enabling grassroots conservatives to engage the legislative and political process.